MARYSVILLE GLOBE
The Official Newspaper for
Marysville WA

May 1914

Volume XXIII Number Friday, May 1, 1914
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
accident - mill Hansen, C. M. Local and Personal - C. M. Hansen had one of his fingers "clipped" while sawing at McMaster's Mill this week.
birth Jennings, baby boy Local and Personal - Born to Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Jennings on Wednesday, April 22, a boy
Indian Local and Personal - Last Sunday a religious meeting was held at Mr. H. Steve's place, near Stimson Crossing. Many Siwashes gathered there, Mr. J. Regan and son, Ernest representing splendidly the Boston men. They spoke of building a small church in that end of the Reservation. Mr. Henry Steve is a well educated and progressive Indian, who lately received his "Certificate of Competency", - he is now owning his land, a voter and lo! a taxpayer. There are now in the Tulalip Indian Reservation three Siwashes who are American citizens: Mrs. Tyee George, Mr. Jim Thomas and Mr. Henry Steve. May Uncle Sam Bless You!
move Bedford, Jimmie Local and Personal - Word was received that Jimmie Bedford is at Eugene OR. Jimmie left here recently for Oregon with the intention of buying a farm, but so far he has not found anything to suit him.
weather Local and Personal - One of the worst wind storms in the history of the Sound country occurred last Sunday evening. Many of our local people were out in launches on the Sound and were forced to stay out all night. Mr. and Mrs. F. G. Merrick, accompanied by the Misses Johnson and Foley, with "Billie" Andrews as commodore, were spending the day at Joe Heel's Bay. They were returning home and were near Speebidan when the wind struck them They immediately started for land but the wind kicked up such a choppy seas that their batteries were put out of commission before they were within a quarter of a mile of shore. They immediately cast anchor and were rowed to shore one at a time where they spend the night in a cabin. The next morning at 8:00 they arrived in Marysville harbor-- tired and wet but none the worse for the adventure. Willis Tallman also had a crowd of young people out in the big launch, but got home safely that same night. We are informed that there were a number of very sick young men and women on board before the craft was finally safe in port. The Bartlett boys also had a rather thrilling experience and their boat came near capsizing.

Volume XXIII Number Friday, May 8, 1914
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
accident - child Goodman, Clifford Local and Personal - Clifford Goodman, the four-year-old son of Mr. Goodman fell from a shed last Thursday and broke his arm. From last reports he is getting along nicely.
born Beaman, baby boy Born to Mr. and Mrs. Claude Beaman on Saturday evening, May second a eleven pound baby boy.
born Sullivan, baby boy Kellogg Marsh - Born to Mr. and Mrs. Henry Sullivan on Monday May 4th a 9 pound boy.
death Fiman, Hattie Local and Personal - Mrs. Hattie Fiman died in the Providence Hospital at Everett, Sunday, after a lingering illness. She is survived by a husband and three daughters. She has resided in Marysville for a number of years, and owned a ranch east of Town on the Getchell road. The funeral was held in Everett on Tuesday was held in Everett on Tuesday and the Interment took place in the Evergreen Cemetery at that place.
indian Loughrey, Myrtle Miss Myrtle Loughrey, a great great grand daughter of Chief Seattle, the sponsor of the unveiling of the heroic statue of Chief Seattle on Denny Hill, now on employ in the U. S. Indian service at Tulalip where she has been many years a pupil, has for a while gone to Court-Mission Reservation, her home.
marriage Nisonger, Hazel
- Magee, Leonard
Local and Personal - Miss Hazel Nisonger and Mr. Leonard Magee, of Marysville were married in Seattle on Saturday, May 2. Both contracting parties are well known in Marysville and are popular among the young people. Mr. Magee has lived here for the past two years and is a shareholder in the Mutual Mill. The Globe unites with their friends in wishing Mr. and Mrs. Magee a long and prosperous married life.
move Leonard, Fred Local and Personal - Fred Leonard left Marysville last week for Minneapolis where he will live with his mother and brother. Fred has lived here for several years with his aunt, Mrs. Ed. Steele, and was well liked by all who knew him.

Volume XXIII Number Friday, May 15, 1914
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
deceased Davidson, John Final accounts... John Davidson, Deceased.. Mary A. Davidson, the administratrix
military A letter from Old Mexico
U.S.S. Stewart, Mazatlan, Mexico, May 5, 1914. Dear Sir: As I am in the Navy came Marysville, I thought I would write you a few lines about Mexico to publish in your paper. That is if you care to. I will make it a kind of log.
23 Apr 1914. Stewart, Paul Jones, Whipple (flag staff) Turxton and Peny left San Diego Bay 10:00 a.m.
26 Apr 1914. We came to anchor at Mazatlan Mexico. There was a Japanese man of war in also the U.S.S. California and Raligh. Raligh left sometime during the night also a Mexican gunboat.
27 Apr 1914. U.S.S. Junipter came in about 6:30 a.m. some Mexican steamer took federal gunboat in tow started taking her across a bar and up the river. As they were crossing the bar the line broke and she went on the bar. She is still there 6:20 p.m. U.S.S. Stewart, Paul Jones underway, U.S.S. Turxton as guard. U.S.S. Jupiter underway 6:30 p.m. for La Paz, lower California.
28 Apr 1914. U.S.S. Stewart, Paul Jones and Peny came to anchored outside Topolbampo 1:30 p.p. The Stewart was to be sent in first. We went in 4:00 p.m. We had ammunition for all guns. Had four rifle man in each rooming town. Nothing happened, we moored to dock. There was only about twenty of the rebel army left in town, as about one hundred and fifty left a few days before. We passed a rebel gunboat on our way in. She was sunk up to her main deck. A federal gunboat had sunk her a few days before.
29 Apr 1914. U.S.S. Paul Jones came along side of us, 4:30 p.m.
30 Apr 1914. We expected some refugees at 4:30 p.m. by train. The rebel afraid that we would capture it and go inland. The refugees got some mule teams and started for Topolobampo. About 15 miles out they were held by some rebels because they had no passport. We sent a flag car with hand car died on to each end outside the town about seven miles to meet them, bring them rest of way.

1 May 1914. We got the last load aboard 3:30 a.m. underway 6:30 a.m. U.S.S. Paul Jones stayed inside passed the U.S.S. Peny on her way in. We met the S. S. Mazatlan 2:30 p.m. transferred our refugees, proceeded on to La Paz arriving there 6:30 p.m. U.S.S. Annaplis was along side of Jupiter, coaling. U.S.S. Peny Whipple came in 9:30 p.m.
2 May 1914. U.S.S. Annapolis finished coaling 7:30 a.m. U.S.S. Whipple went on one side of Jupiter, Stewart on the other. both finished coaling Stewart left 6:30 p.m.
3 May 1914. Passed U.S.S. Paul Jones on her way to La Paz to coal 11:30 a.m. Anchored at Mazatlan 2:30 p.m. The torpedo boats Lawrence and Hull, U.S.S. California, Iris also a German and Jap man of war in Albany came in about 9:30 p.m. She left same day.
4 May 1914. When we got up the rebels were firing at the federal gunboat with machine guns, keeping from mamming their guns, they could only fire the guns on forcastle. A lunch made two attempts to along side the gunboat, but the rebel machine guns made so hot they had to beat it back to town. They were firing all day long. The fort fired a few sharpnels over the rebels heads. We could see two dead Mexicans throught he glasses. They fired off and on through the night.
5 May 1914. This morning they started firing at the gunboat with fied guns, then the fort started firing at them with there guns. Sure some battle. Well I must close as the mail leaves 6:00 a.m. Yours Truly C. J. Bird, U.S.S. Stewart, San Diego, CA

Volume XXIII Number Friday, May 22, 1914
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
accident - burn Kidder, Tommy Tommy Kidder, the 19 month old child of Mr. and Mrs. Mike Kidder, was quite severely burned about the face and chest one day last week when he pulled a kettle of hot water off of the sideboard. He is recovering and it is thought that no bad scars will be left on his face.
born Carr, baby boy Kellogg Marsh - Born to Mr. and Mrs. Carr on Thursday, May 14 a son.
born Tallman, baby boy Born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Tallman, on Thursday, May 14th, a boy.
death - animal Marysville Transfer Co. Loses Valuable Horse
Thursday evening while loading bricks at the City Wharf, the Marysville Transfer Co. lost a fine bay horse by drowning. In backing down the slip to hook onto the wagon, the horse stumbled and fell into the water. Sep Irvine, who was driving the team, cut the horse loose from his mate, so he wouldn't be dragged into the water too, and as soon as this was done the bay sunk under the water and did not come up again. A few bubbles was all that showed where he sank. As we go to press no trace of the carcass could be found. It is hoped that the harness can be recovered as it is a good one.
death - animal Local and Personal - Mr. Barreman, of Skookum Airedale Farm, has had very bad luck of late. He has lost four of his Airedales the past few weeks, one of them being his prize female, which cost him $100.00 in cash. G. O. Hawley also lost a fine Collie last week. There seems to be an epidemic of distemper or something like that among the canie (sic) population in this vicinity, and no medical skill seems to check the disease.
fire - mill Fire broke out at the McMaster Mill last Saturday afternoon, but prompt and efficient work soon had the flame extinguished.
law - humor do more Rules of the Road
Automobiles, Take Notice!
Regulations
1. Upon discovering an Approaching Team the automobilist must stop off-side and cover his machine with a blanket painted to correspond to the scenery.
2. The Speed Limit on Country Roads this Year will be a Secret, and the penalty for violation will be $10 for every mile an offender is caught goin in excess of it.
3. In Case an Automobile makes a team run away, the penalty will be $50 for the first mile and $100 for the second $200 for the third, etc. that the team runs; in addition to the usual damages.
4. On Approaching a Corner, where he cannot command a view of the road ahead, the automobilist must stop and less than 200 yards from the turn, toot his horn , ring a bell, fire a revolver, halloo, and send up three bombs at intervals of five minutes.
5. Automobiles must again be Seasonably Painted, that is so that they will merge with the pastoral ensemble and not be startling. They must be green in the spring, golden in summer, red in autumn and white in winter.
6. Automobiles Running on the Country Roads at Night, must send up a red rocked Every MIle, and Wait Ten Minutes for the road to clear. They may then proceed carefully, blowing their horns and shooting roman Candles.
7. All Members of the Society will give up Sunday to chasing automobiles shooting and shouting at them, making arrests and otherwise discouraging country touring on that day.
8. In Case a Horse will not pass an Automobile, the automobilist will take the machine apart as rapidly as possible and conceal he parts in the grass.
9. In case an Automobile Approaching a Farmer's House when the Roads are Dusty. It will slow down to one mile an hour and the chauffeur will lay the dust in front of the house with a vacuum cleaner worked over the dashboard.
marriage Tiedemann, Clara
- English, Oliver
Pumpkin Holler Notes - Miss Clara Tiedemann, of Arlington and Mr. Oliver English, of Marysville were married in Everett, Monday morning. The ring ceremony was pronounced by Rev. William E. Randall, at his Wetmore avenue residence. Mrs. Maude English and Ed Miedemann were the attendants. The young people will reside at Marysville Everett Herald
motorcycle advertisement - The reports from all over the world shows the Indian a most consistant winner of road races endurance contests, as well as track events. The races at Cohasset Beach was no exception to the rule. Indian riders winning first and second in every event with the best riders of all makes of motorcycles in Washington represented. This course was two and one-half miles straight away and return or five miles to the lap, which gave the best machine the best chance and the fact that Indian riders in all events finished three, four and five miles ahead of the nearest rider on any other make surely speaks well for the endurance and speed of the machines. The only machine with a flat spring cradle front and rear fork and this is the reason it is the only machine that is electric equipped by the factory. Seven different models. From $215.00 to $340.00. The very best and latest of everything on the Indian. Arthur A. Baily, Sporting Goods and Hdwre Store. Distributor for Snohomish County, Baily Block, Everett WA
people - Meeker Meeker, Ezra Undiminished in zeal, Ezra Meeker, pioneer of the Oregon trail, is once more about to take to the road with his ox team and pioneer wagon, to renew his work as a trail blazer, and to spread the fame of the state of Washington. Early in May the sprightly old man, past eighty in years, will set out from Tacoma on a journey to San Francisco where he will spend the year 1915 at the Panama-Pacific exposition exhibiting his outfit in the Washington State building, and working with maps and data which he has collected to demonstrate the need and feasibility of a national highway across the continent, following the Oregon trail which the pioneer blazed and crossing the State of Washington via Snoqualmie pass to tidewater on Puget Sound. Meeker will finance his journey southward by sales of his books. He will travel under the auspices of the state exposition commission and will distribute booster literature as he goes. The first stage of his journey will terminate at Portland where he will attend the pioneers reunion in June. After that his plans will be governed by circumstances and the condition of his oxen. He will drive the same team which he retraced the Oregon trail on his trip across the continent in 1906.
school McCorkindale, Myrtle E. Local and Personal - We are in receipt of an invitation to the graduating exercises of the trained nurses at the Providence Hospital in Seattle. among the names of the graduates is that of Miss Myrtle E. McCorkindale of this city. The exercises will be held at the Holy Names Academy on Tuesday evening, May 26 at 8 o'clock p.m.

Volume XXIII Number Friday, May 29, 1914
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
accident - auto McCorkindale, Allen
-
Local and Personal - Allen McCorkindale had what might have been a serious accident last Thursday evening. He was returning from a ride in the auto and met a driver with a horse and buggy near the Michigan mill. It was very dark and he did not see the rig until a short distance of it when he turned the auto sharply to one side only to find that he was headed straight for a mail box. He then turned quickly back towards the road and the auto skidded and turned turtle twice. One of the wheels was broken and the hood was smashed, but the engine did not stop running. Allen was uninjured with the exception of a few bruises. It was sure a lucky escape.
accident - burn Jones, Mrs.
-
Kellogg Marsh - Miss Bessie and Celia Ashmund spent the week end at Jordan and attended a benefit basket social given for the Mrs. Jones who was so badly burned three weeks ago.
law - humor
-
Rules of the Road
Horse drivers Take Notice!
Regulations
1. Upon discovering an approaching auto, the buggy driver must take to the ditch, wade in the pond or hang from a tree.
2. If an auto runs less that sixty miles an hour, the buggy driver will if he can, catch it's number and swear against its people a warrant for acknowledging a speed limit.
3. In case an auto makes a horse run away, the driver will be fined $10, in addition to the usual costs. 4. On approaching a corner, when the horse driver cannot command a view of the road ahead, he will hide in the brush, horse, buggy and himself, until an auto will have gone by.
5. Buggies must now get a coat of bright paint, less they may not look like the rest of the road and be run down accordingly.
6. People driving on County Roads at night are forbidden to use any light whatever, in order they may be seen from far.
7. Men will be on Sunday deputized by the Sheriff to patrol the roads and keep them clear for the autos use.
8. If a horse cannot pass an auto the driver will unhitch, upset the buggy, and turn the horse to the pond master.
9. In case a farmer sees a cloud raised on the road by an auto, he will bless the Lord for such a spring shower, and with a vacuum cleaner gather the dust to be spread on fruit trees, flower and vegetables.
law - letter to editor
-
Dear Sir ... "I had about come to the conclusion that the proper place for a person who was compelled to drive a horse during the motor season was on the side of the road, and Automobiles seem to think he should give them all of the road and both ditches.
I do not believe there is any other law that should be so rigidly enforced as the law governing the motor travel on public high ways. And yet this law is scarely known, and there are very few motorists who pay any attention to it aside from seeing that they have the required license.
In Sec. 8 of Chapter 154 of the law of the state of Wash. I find the following. "The driver or operator of every automobile or motor vehicle shall turn to the right in meeting vehicles, teams and persons moving in an opposite direction, and turn to the RIGHT in passing vehicles, teams and persons moving and headed in the same direction." The law does not say that the person ahead shall turn out at all, he simply does it as an act of courtesy, or as an act of self preservation, it is more often the latter.
I would indeed like to see this law published and distributed so everyone in charge of motor vehicle would be more familiar with it.
The most of Co. motorists seem to think that the law requires them to have a horn in order to order people off the road. ...(large paragraph of section 9)... This does not sound to me like the law gave a motorist permission to cover their cars with pennants and streamers and then see how fast they can go past teams on the road. o
I think the city of Marysville have solved the problem of inforcing the speed regulation. I believe if any motorist undertakes to drive faster than twenty-five miles over the south half of EASY street he will agree with me. We have named the street running from Stimpsons track north to the Norumtown church Easy St. not that the people who live out here are easy to see the difference, but because there is so much difference between the road that is kept graded and the one that never has anything done on it, that it is easy to see the difference.
It is rumored that the city intends to repair their part of this street, I am sure it was heeded it long ago, last winter it was not hard to tell when I come to the city line. I have heard several farmers say they could drive to Arlington or Everett easier than to wallow their way into Marysville. Helmer V. Jennings R. L. C. No. 1
letter to the editor - wages Barraman, Al.
-
Communicated... Mr. Editor. In looking over your interesting little paper of May 22nd issue. I noticed this item "Effective June 21, $10 will be minimum wage for girls of 18 and over and women employed in stores throughout this state." Now on first sight that looked good to me, but I soon saw the little joker. Girls of 18 and over. How about the girls under 18. You know and I know that girls employed in stores are all under 18 or most of them. If you don't believe me ask them how about their wages. Don't a 16 year old girl earn as much as her 18 year old sister - we all know they do. Now what effect will the new law have. All girls working in stores must be under 18. Do you get me? they can be hired for about one half the minimum wage proposed by the new law. If the industrial welfare commission cannot frame a law that will help all girls that have to work for a living they best quit. We know that any girl that stands behind a counter all day earns $10 per week, whether she be 16 or 60, so why put in the joker that the girl must be 18 or over. I'll tell you why- it gives the employers a hole to crawl through, and , believe me, the new law is not worth the paper it is printed on, and until we get a welfare commission with gray matter enough in their think tank to frame a law that has no look holes, the working girl will be overworked and underpaid. Al. Barraman
marriage Bates, Elva
- Lashua, Clyde
Local and Personal - Miss Elva Bates and Mr. Clyde Lashua were quietly married in Everett on Saturday afternoon. There ceremony took place at the home of the officiating minister. Rev. William E. Randall. Miss Ruth Hawley and Mr. Roy Hall were the attendants. After a short wedding trip Mr. and Mrs. Lashua will make their home in Marysville.
marriage Shadbolt, Mabel
- Corbella, Tony
Shadbolt-Corbelia
Miss Mabel Shadbolt and Mr. Tony Corbella, both of Seattle were married at the Presbyterian parsonage in Everett on May 14th by the Rev. Dunnon, Mrs. Corbella in the daughter of Mrs. Mary Shadbolt of Marysville. the young couple spent a few with Mr. and Mrs. Sam Andrews on their ranch north of town, returning to Seattle last Tuesday morning where they will make their future home. Mr. Corbella owns and operates a laundry in the city.
move Blair, Mrs. Clarence
-
Local and Personal - Mrs. Clarence Blair left Monday morning for Berine WA where her husband has employment. They will make their future home at that place.


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